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Thread: Baristas and Roaster sound off!

  1. #11
    Cyberpunk as Fuck Punk to the bone yan tree's Avatar
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    I got some Zapatista's coffee about 6 months ago...but I had to get a cafetiere....or whatevs its called...lost the coffee tin since then ha ha ha

    at work its usually Supermarket cheapest instant.
    I usually get Douwe Egberts
    oh there's some Maxwell house & some Nescafe Ariza or summat



  2. #12
    Internet Nerd Punk Punk stinkbot's Avatar
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    IMG_1949.jpg
    Delicious natural Ethiopian from Yirgacheffe
    35g dose
    500g water
    extraction time 3:45
    fucking perfection. Berries, stone fruit and hugs from your mom.

  3. #13
    Cyberpunk as Fuck Punk to the bone damien inbred's Avatar
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    Neither roaster nor barista... yet.

    I'll post pics of my home setup tomorrow!

  4. #14
    Needs a Life Punk to the bone
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    I have only started drinking coffee regularly in the past 2 years or so and have only recently started investigating the brewing process in any detail. Based on what I have read, it seems that the best set up for home brewing that one can achieve without spending substantial sums of money is to get a pour over dripper or a french press. So my question to those who have made coffee their craft, what would you recommend? I would like to spend less than $50 but want somwthing that makes better coffee than my cheap electric drip coffee maker.

  5. #15
    Internet Nerd Punk Punk stinkbot's Avatar
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    So, just lemme get atop this here soapbox a minute...
    Pour overs are great, if you have a scale, a reliable source of brewing temperature water, a proper grinder (expect to spend at least $100.00) and the skills required to make it great. The skills though can be acquired by watching youtube tutorials, and there is one I recommend that I will post here, but the equipment required to make a good cup of coffee can get expensive.
    Pour overs, unless you have spent hours a day practicing and understand the differences in brew methods and have the muscle memory to pour the same way every time, are almost always totally inconsistent. Even the most practiced baristas don't always take the time to learn the process and execute with perfection each time.
    There are exceptions, Aeropress is relatively inexpensive, about $24.00 and really forgiving. It somehow throws all the rules out the window and you can really fuck with the parameters and come out with a great cup.
    The Kalita Wave. A pour over like the Hario V60, or Chemex, but really forgiving. You can use store ground coffee and not end up with a bad cup.
    French press...use it for tea. Most people with it up and I never enjoy it when I have one at a friends house.
    You can get a good, consistent cup with a store bought machine, but they usually never get the water to the correct temp unless you spend a lot more money.
    Oh and proper brewing temp is between 195-205 degrees f.

  6. #16
    Needs a Life Punk to the bone
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    Good info, but I am not sure what the take away is. Seems like the implication is that unless I can lay out for higher-end equipment and have time to get very familiar with it that I am just as well off with an electric drip machine as I am with anything else? I was looking at getting a pour over and a burr grinder and spending maybe $70 total, which seemed doable, but is your view that at that level the quality will not be much different from what I am doing now? I do not mind spending time to dvelop technique but do not have the resources for expensive equipment at the moment.

  7. #17
    Internet Nerd Punk Punk stinkbot's Avatar
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    Yes. unless you spend the time and money getting really good equipment, you're better off just buying a decent machine. Scales, great grinders, and gooseneck kettles are key components to a really well made cup of coffee. But if you want to just have a lot of fun playing with coffee, start getting stuff and and start nerding out. Like I said, I spent years gathering my stuff and when I started it was pretty brutal, but I was emotionally invested. I discovered that this is what I want to do so that's where my resources went.

  8. #18
    Internet Nerd Punk Punk stinkbot's Avatar
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    But!...
    Here are some resources:
    Hario V60
    Aeropress
    Kalita Wave
    Refurbished Baratza grinders
    A nice kettle
    I picked up this scale at a Post Office for $20. It can register weight in grams, ideal for coffee.
    And this is my favorite tutorial, the method is useful for many brew methods too.
    Last edited by stinkbot; 10-04-2017 at 10:43 PM.

  9. #19
    Needs a Life Punk to the bone
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    Thanks for the info, I will check it all out. I have an extremely accurate kitchen scale as I am passionate about baking and switched from volumetric to weight based measuring some years back for the sake of accuracy and consistency in my baked goods. I will check out the grinders and various brewing devices you linked to. It seems like I ought to be able to do better than my bog standard electric machine with something even if only because I can control the water temperature and I can bypass the paper filter which sucks up so manY of the delicious oils.
    Last edited by zombie_warfare; 10-05-2017 at 08:36 PM.

  10. #20
    Internet Nerd Punk Punk stinkbot's Avatar
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    I used that postal scale for years until I hired a part time barista who also worked for Acaia. When he moved to Portland, as a parting gift he gave me an Acaia Pearl.

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